Carolyn Strom

Professor of Early Childhood Literacy - New York University, Dept. of Teaching & Learning

Carolyn Strom

Professor of Early Childhood Literacy - New York University, Dept. of Teaching & Learning

Biography

Dr. Carolyn Strom is a professor of practice and researcher at New York University (NYU) whose work focuses on improving early language outcomes and reading experiences for young children. As a reading specialist and former public elementary school teacher, Dr. Strom has spent the last two decades working at the intersection of research and practice, presenting her work at over fifty national and international conferences on reading development.

Beyond Topsoil Teaching: Tending to the Roots of Children’s Early Language & Literacy Development

From birth to age 5, a child’s brain develops more than at any other time in life. While a great deal of neuroscientific research exists on the cognitive roots of reading development, this knowledge is rarely shared in practical ways for early childhood teachers or caregivers. This interactive presentation showcases a project between university faculty and early childhood teachers that focuses on the practical application of neuroscience to build deeper professional knowledge and evidence-based practices so that all young children are prepared to read and thrive.

From birth to age 5, a child’s brain develops more than at any other time in life. While a great deal of neuroscientific research exists on the cognitive roots of reading development, this knowledge is rarely shared in practical ways for early childhood teachers or caregivers. This interactive presentation showcases a project between university faculty and early childhood teachers that focuses on the practical application of neuroscience to build deeper professional knowledge and evidence-based practices so that all young children are prepared to read and thrive.
DETAILED PRESENTATION DESCRIPTION/ SUMMARY: From birth to age 5, a child’s brain develops more than at any other time in life. While a great deal of neuroscientific research exists on the cognitive roots of reading development, this knowledge is rarely shared in practical ways for early childhood teachers or caregivers. This presentation showcases a partnership project between a university and early childhood teachers that focuses on the real world application of neuroscience to build deeper professional knowledge and evidence-based practices so that all young children are prepared to read and thrive.
Early childcare workers and caregivers have an important role in supporting beginning reading processes and giving students a strong foundation yet they are often not given access to the latest scientific research on how the young brain develops. This session’s title makes reference to needing to go beyond “topsoil teaching” in order to call attention to the value of having a deep understanding of the roots of early reading development, based on what neuroscience tells us about the developing brain.

Specifically, I will approach this session by breaking down ideas about how the brain works as it begins to read and how we can best prepare young children for this phenomenal task. This session will integrate insights developed out of a research-practice partnership between university faculty and publicly funded preschools focused on the application of early literacy research; by highlighting this work, this session puts an additional emphasis on collaboration between school systems and institutions of higher education.

For any delegate who is curious about the neuroscience of what happens in young children’s brains as they learn to read, they will find insight and inspiration about what is possible with young children and their families. By using animation, video vignettes, and interactive exercises, the science of learning to read will be clear and memorable.

All sessions by Carolyn Strom