Zoltan Pompor

Educational Developer - The Curriculum and Learning Material Developing Group of the Reformed Church in Hungary

Zoltan Pompor

Educational Developer - The Curriculum and Learning Material Developing Group of the Reformed Church in Hungary

Biography

Zoltán POMPOR PhD is the leader of the The Curriculum and Learning Material Developing Group of the Reformed Church in Hungary, also a lecturer of the subjects: children’s literature and reading motivation at the Károli Gáspar University of the Reformed Church in Hungary. Last year presented a book on reading motivation (Tell a tale to help them read). Member of the board of the Hungarian Reading Association.

Peregrin – a virtual journey through the history of the Reformed schools

The Curriculum and Learning Material Developing Group of the Reformed Church in Hungary with the help of an online gamified learning platform made a two-month pilot in which they connected technology and literacy. 12-16-year-old students and their teachers all over the country were invited to submit their applications to participate in a knowledge contest. During their exciting adventure, children learn in a playful way about the history of the Reformed schools by solving various educational tasks.

During traditional classroom trainings, children were introduced to lots of information, but it was not enough to engage them with the topic of Reformed school history. Not to mention that after classes their newly acquired knowledge vanished rapidly. With the help of an online gamified learning platform we have transformed education into a game-like learning experience. During their exciting adventure, children had to retrieve lost data while traveling from one city to the next with the help of their virtual hero, Peregrin. Children could move forward in the story and getting closer to find the lost information by reading and solving comprehension tests. Participating students formed teams and applied for the two-month contest with the help of the mentors from their schools. They had to mobilize such important 21st century skills like cooperation, critical thinking, creativity and communication. They paid virtual visits to historic sites, and after each completed task, they were rewarded with points, which they could redeem for valuable prizes. To process the acquired knowledge, children voluntarily completed in real-life activities related to the topics, and they shared their experience with readers on their dedicated online blogs.

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